British Values

At St. Joseph’s we have been exploring three questions as part of our British Values learning—

1. What does it mean to be British?

2. What is it like to live in Britain?

3. What are the values we hold?

 

Answering these questions has led our learning.  We have explored the five fundamental aspects of British Values through a range of activities. 

These aspects are -

1. Democracy

2. Rule of law

3. Tolerance of different cultures and religions

4. Mutual respect

5. Individual liberty

 

We have interwoven these five aspects into our British Values lessons, and have also created displays in our classrooms for everyone to promote and engage with British Values and consider how they impact and influence all aspects of our lives.  We believe that through educating our children about what it means to be British, they will flourish in participating fully and contributing positively to life in modern Britain as conscientious citizens.

 

We have extended our learning during times of celebration and reflection, such as Black History Month and Remembrance Day.  However, we embed the values in a cross-curricular theme also, such as during Inter-Faith Week as part of the RE curriculum.

Please click below to view Our St Joseph's Statement

St Joseph's British Values Statement

Further information from the DFE regarding British Values can be found by clicking here

Spring 2019

British Values Year 1 - Year 6

Reception - 

Democracy

Our focus for British Values week this week is ‘Democracy’.

As teacher I gave the children some new rules for our class;

 No smiling

 No playing with your friends

 I choose the area, not the children.

We talked about if they liked the rules and if they thought it was fair that I decided the rules all by myself. As a class, we decided we didn’t like them and so we came up with some class rules ourselves, linking them to our whole-school rules.

We decided, as a class, that we liked these rules so we each put our finger print on the rules to show we were going to follow them.

Individual Liberty

Our focus for British Values week this week is ‘Individual Liberty’.

We have been learning about how we are all different, but that our differences and individuality helps to make us special.

For homework, we talked about our individuality and found out about the individuality of our family.

We created a display in class of all the different places that our class comes from, from around the World and talked about how special it makes us all.

Rule Of Law

Our focus for British Values week this week is ‘Rule of Law’.

In Reception, we have talked about rules and laws and discussed why we think they are important, and we need them.

We talked about who enforces the rules that we have thinking about adults in school, or at home, Police, but also that we,    ourselves, need to enforce rules as well.

 

Year 1 -

14.12.18 - The children discussed how we could be anything and do anything we wanted as long as it didn't break a rule or a law.

14.1.19 - The children completed a quiz and we discussed the difference between a rule and a law and why we need both of these things to keep us safe.

 

Year 2 - 

For individual liberty, during a circle time session, Y2 discussed the meaning of individual liberty and we remembered what we had learnt about Nelson Mandela. We also talked about whether it is really okay to do just what we like and also the importance of allowing others their individual liberty.

 

For rule of law, we discussed our roles and responsibilities. We looked at individual responsibilities as well as those of people in the wider communities. We recognised the importance of team work and talked about what would happen if people decided to ignore their responsibilities. This led us to understand why rules are an important part of life.

 

Year 3 - 

We discussed the differences between rules and laws. Then in our groups we democratically came up with a list of rules and laws we would have if we were put on a deserted island .

 

Year 4 - 

Democracy: The children used democracy in class to decide on their school councillors. They were able to stand up and give reasons why they would be good school councillors. The rest of the children listened to the points they made, and asked them questions afterwards. Reminders were given about what democracy was, and why this is a fair way of deciding out school councillor. Children afterwards voted to decide on who our class councillor would be.

 

Rule of Law: The children discussed  together why we have rules, what they are used for, and how they help us. They considered the difference between a rule and a law, and decided how these help us in our everyday lives. The children then imagined they were abandoned as a group on a desert island. They considered what rules they would need to have to work together in this situation.

 

Tolerance of other cultures and faiths: The children found out about different cultures over time, and the treatment of black people at different points in history. They recognised what intolerance was, and the people who fought against this. They then focused on Paul Stevenson who campaigned successfully in Bristol, which led to a change in law for black rights in Britain.

 

Mutual Respect: The children began the year considering the ‘treasures of our school’, thinking about the ways we show mutual respect to one another, and how this makes the school a special place. They wrote this as a prayer afterwards.

On ‘Remembrance Day’, the children showed respect for those who had lost their lives in war. They found out about ‘Remembrance Day’, and the purpose of this, writing a poem in reflection.

Year 5 -

Democracy

The class worked in groups to discuss their understanding of what makes a good school councillor.

Children wrote manifestos for why they should be school councillors, and they presented these to the rest of the class.

A democratic vote was then held to elect the new Year 5 school councillors.

Individual Liberty

As a class, we started our session by considering what the word freedom meant, and we looked at what is and isn’t considered freedom. The children learnt that individual liberty means having the freedom to choose the way we want to live. They then looked at a book called ‘We Are All Born Free,’ which contains the Declaration of Human Rights in pictures. The class discussed their individual rights, and then they focused on a picture in the book, which was labelled, ‘Freedom Park’. In groups, the children worked together to find different ways that the children in the park were expressing their individual liberty. They then presented their findings to the rest of the class. To finish, the class wrote their own understanding of individual liberty in a speech bubble. 

Rule Of Law

Year 5 continued to develop their understanding of rules by considering why society has laws. They started their session by thinking about what a world would be like without laws. They then looked at an image of a person holding the scales representing the law. The children considered why the law is the same for everyone, it doesn’t have favourites, doesn’t look at the person etc. The children learnt about how laws are passed in Parliament, and then they worked in groups to develop their own law about current topical issues.

Year 6 -

So far this academic year, Year 6 has covered democracy, tolerance of other faiths and rule of law. Below tells you more information on what the class did as part of their learning:

 Democracy

We linked our learning to our History to study key events and changes in Britain’s democracy with links to WW2. We studied the absolute monarch of King Henry 8th and Queen Elizabeth 1st, and explored the change to constitutional monarch through key influencers such as Oliver Cromwell. We studied our current government to break down how parliament, the Queen, houses of Lords and Commons join together to make decisions about our country. We also discovered more about the suffragettes, which led to equality for women and the right to vote.

Interesting fact: Our Queen Elizabeth was an engineer in WW2, and her Dad King George 6th was monarch during the war.

 Tolerance of other faiths

The children studied the faith of Judaism as part of their interfaith fortnight learning.  Children reflected on the big question ‘how do Jewish followers ask for forgiveness?’ They visited the local nursing home as a ‘good deed linked to this question. They also looked at Rosh Hashanah, which is the Jewish New Year. Children reflected this back on their own lives about setting new goals and created information booklets to share with others.

 Rule of law

The children created a poster to inform others on climate change. They looked at environmental law and why these are put in place to help protect the environment and keep it sustained. They explored changes to the environment through pollution and watched video clips to help them understand and learn facts linked to the law and changes. This also links to our current topic on ‘Frozen Kingdom.’

Autumn 2018

British Values Year 1 - Year 6

 

Year 1

Democracy- The year 1 class held a vote to decide on their class councillors. They also worked together to create a list of class rules to compliment that of the school.

The children developed their understanding of why people vote and how fairness is an important part of democracy.

 

Year 2

Democracy- Children learnt that people in Great Britain have the power to make important choices. They were given the choice of three fictitious leaders and voted for their favourite. They learnt about how voting takes place and how important it is to think carefully when voting.

They then went on to select their class councillors.

Tolerance of other cultures and faiths- Children found out about different cultures over time, and the treatment of black people at a certain point in history. They recognised what inequality is, and how certain people have fought against it. They then focused on Nelson Mandela whose protests led to a change in law for black rights in South Africa. Children understood what inequality was and also how people were able to make a difference.

Individual Liberty- A circle time discussion took place in which children shared views on their own, as well as other people’s, individual liberty. We compared our lives to those of people in history, when Nelson Mandela chose to stand up for human rights.

Mutual Respect- Children showed respect for those who had lost their lives in war. They found out about remembrance day, and the purpose of this. They painted a field of poppies in reflection. Children developed a respect and appreciation for what people in the past have done for them.

Year 3-

Democracy- The children recalled key features of democracy by using examples from U.K. topics. They created a poster on democracy and held a class election when choosing their school councillors.

Individual Liberty- The children created a written conversation, giving examples of their rights and their individual liberty.

Year 4

Democracy- The children recognised the fairness of democracy in their decision making for their school councillor. A speaking and listening activity took place in which each child gave a speech about why they would be a good school councillor. After discussing the importance of a fair democracy, children voted to decide who their class councillor should be.

Tolerance of other cultures and faiths- Children found out about different cultures over time, and the treatment of black people at different points in history. They recognised what intolerance was, and the people who fought against this. They then focused on Paul Stevenson who campaigned successfully in Bristol, which led to a change in law for black rights in Britain. Children understood what intolerance was, and understood how people were able to change things that happened.

Mutual Respect- Children showed respect for those who had lost their lives in war. They found out about remembrance day, and the purpose of this, writing a poem in reflection. Children were able to respect and have an appreciation of what people in the past and today have done for them.

Year 5

Democracy- Children worked in groups to discuss their understanding of what makes a good school councillor. They wrote manifestos for why they should be school councillors and a vote was held to decide the outcome. The children were able to discuss the importance of voting and developed an understanding of what democracy means.

Rule of Law- Children played a board game and Miss Vickers deliberately cheated to show the children the importance of rules. A discussion was held and the new school rules were covered. In groups, children worked together to explore why we

have the 5 school rules, what would happen if we didn’t have them and what the consequence would be if the rules were not followed.

Tolerance of other cultures and faiths- The children developed their understanding of tolerance through the Come and See unit about Judaism. Within this topic, the children learnt about Jewish values, some of their customs and traditions, and an important prayer called the Schema. Through this, they developed their understanding and tolerance of another religion.

Year 6-

Democracy- Children learnt about democracy through their history topic, WW2. They studied the key events and changes in Britain’s leadership over a period of time. Children now have an awareness of the impacts these changes have had on democracy, including equality for women and the working class.

Tolerance of other cultures and faiths- Children reflected on the big question- ‘How do Jewish followers ask for forgiveness?’

They visited a nursing home as a ‘good deed’ and also looked at Rosh Hashanah, which is the Jewish new year. The children reflected this back on their own lives and set themselves new goals. The children have shown an awareness of another faith and how Jewish followers ask for forgiveness and make new starts. They are able to recognise similarities and differences between the Rosh Hashanah and their own faith

 

British Values

British Values 2017/18

Rule of Law
 
As part of our British Values curriculum, we are holding school-wide focus afternoons.  The first was rule of law where we explored the importance of having rules and why laws are in place to keep us safe.  Each class did different activities, with some exploring the rules associated with sports games, rules for staying safe online (in conjunction with Internet Safety Day), whilst others created a set of rules for excellent behaviour in the classroom.
 
 
 
We also had a visit from our local PCSOs, who came to talk to everyone about their role in the community.  We learnt that they often help the elderly, attend road traffic accidents, work in partnership with other emergency services, spend time in Rossington talking to residents and, interestingly, collecting stray animals!
The PCSOs also explained their duty to uphold rules and laws to maintain order within the community, and took questions about what happens when people don't follow the laws in place.
 
It was a very informative and interesting assembly and we are very grateful to the PCSOs for giving up their time to visit us!

British Values - PCSO Visit

 

 

Individual Liberty